Dog to be destroyed after killing spree at Dunedin lifestyle block

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It was the ninth time dog control had contacted the owner after the staffordshire bull-mastiff escaped. (file photo)

NICOLE JOHNSTONE/STUFF

It was the ninth time dog control had contacted the owner after the staffordshire bull-mastiff escaped. (file photo)

A dog in Dunedin will be put down after it killed nine chickens, two Flemish giant rabbits and two lambs in a frenzied attack. 

The dog’s owner, Robert Taare, was charged with failing to confine his dog and attacking stock. He did not appear for sentencing at the Dunedin District Court on Tuesday.

The staffordshire bull-mastiff, named ‘Sarge’, attacked the stock at a lifestyle property on January 5. 

The dog killed two Flemish giant rabbits, nine chickens and two lambs during the attack. (file photo)

STUFF

The dog killed two Flemish giant rabbits, nine chickens and two lambs during the attack. (file photo)

On that day, Taare had contacted the Dunedin City Council to report the registered dog missing from his property in the suburb of Kaikorai.

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Dogs responsible for attack will be given lethal injections on Friday

Two hours after the call, the council’s animal control officer was called to a lifestyle property at nearby Helensburgh Rd, where the dog attacked the stock. 

The owner had secured the culprit, later identified as the missing dog. The officer concluded the dog was responsible for killing nine chickens, two Flemish rabbits and two of last year’s lambs.

The dog was seized and reclassified as ‘menancing’, then returned to Taare. 

​Taare offered to pay reparations. 

It was not the first time his dog had escaped – Taare had been spoken to on eight other occasions.

Dunedin City Council compliance, animal and parking services team leader Peter Hanlin told Stuff “We had committed to working with the owner to put measures in place to ensure the dog remained contained on its property”.

The council, represented in court by its counsel Eleanor Bunt, sought the destruction of the dog.

Judge John Macdonald noted the defendant had pleaded not guilty but had failed to appear for a case review.

He was unsure what Taare’s defence would be, given the evidence he had read.

Taare was convicted and ordered to pay court costs of $130, and reparation of $685

The destruction of the dog – via a lethal injection – was also ordered, with Taare not allowed to own another dog for five years.

 

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