Eid-al-Fitr 2019: How is Eid celebrated? Eid decorations and greetings | World | News

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Muslims across the world have been observing the month of Ramadan with fasting. During Ramadan members of the Islamic faith abstain from eating or drinking during daylight hours – a practice they believe brings them closer to God. Ramadan falls in the ninth month of the Muslim calendar and its end is celebrated with a joyous holiday called Eid.

Eid al-Fitr begins when the Shawwal moon is sighted.

A special board of astronomers in Saudi Arabia announce the sighting of the Shawwal Moon and confirm the start of Eid al-Fitr.

How is Eid al-Fitr celebrated?

Eid al-Fitr is celebrated differently across the globe.

But in most Muslim communities the holiday starts off with morning prayers.

After morning prayers a sweet snack is eaten to symbolise the end of Ramadan.

Fasting is forbidden during Eid.

Then family and friends come together to feast and exchange gifts.

Everyone dresses up in brand new clothes to look their best for the day.

Many Muslims enjoy Eid at fairgrounds put on especially for the occasion.

Eid decorations

Many Muslims choose to decorate their homes to mark Eid.

Green is a holy colour for followers of the Islamic faith and green flags, balloons and bunting are hung up to decorate homes.

The crescent moon is another powerful Muslim motif and cut-outs of the moon are used to decorate lamps and windows in Muslim communities.

Shiny green decorative strings are often used on doors and window to spell out the words Eid Mubarak – Happy Eid.

Eid al-Fitr greetings

The traditional Eid greeting is to say “Eid Mubarak.”

Muslims follow this greeting which means “Happy holiday” or “Happy celebrations” with a formal embrace, three times.

The phrase is exchanged by Muslims throughout Eid to wish one another a happy holiday.

“Eid Mubarak” is also emblazoned on balloons and special Eid bunting which is hung up in homes to celebrate the happy time.

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