Air Force vet photographed in Capitol insurrection arrested in Texas

Retired Lt. Colonel Larry Rendall Brock Jr. was charged in federal court with…

Air Force vet photographed in Capitol insurrection arrested in Texas
Air Force vet photographed in Capitol insurrection arrested in Texas 1

Associated Press
 |  The Detroit News

Dallas — A retired Air Force officer who was part of the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol was arrested Sunday in Texas, federal prosecutors said.

Retired Lieutenant Colonel Larry Rendall Brock Jr. was charged Sunday in federal court in the District of Columbia with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, prosecutors said.

During the deadly riot Wednesday, Brock was photographed on the Senate floor wearing a helmet and heavy vest and carrying zip-tie handcuff. He was later identified by a researcher at the University of Toronto and spoke with The New Yorker.

Brock confirmed to the magazine that he was the man in the photographs and claimed he found the zip-tie handcuffs on the floor. “I wish I had not picked those up,” he said.

The Air Force did not immediately respond to inquiries about Brock Sunday.

Also Sunday, Eric Gavelek Munchel was was arrested in Tennessee in connection with the riot. He’s also charged with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Prosecutors say that photos from the riot show a person who appears to be Munchel carrying plastic restraints, an item in a holster on his right hip, and a cell phone mounted on his chest with the camera facing outward, ostensibly to record events that day.

It was not immediately known if Brock or Munchel had attorneys to speak on their behalf.

The rioters on Wednesday took over the House and Senate chambers, smashed windows and waved Trump, American and Confederate flags. Prosecutors have filed dozens of cases so far for a variety of offenses ranging from assaulting police officers to entering restricted areas of the U.S. Capitol, stealing federal property and threatening lawmakers.

Our special thanks to:detroitnews.com

error

Enjoy our news? Please spread the word :)